Food & Skin, Digestive, Respiratory
& Mental / Emotional Diseases

Food and eczema, psoriasis, acne
Food and digestive diseases
Food and respiratory diseases
Food and mental / emotional diseases
Food and headaches, insomnia, fatigue, recurrent infections etc


Food and eczema, psoriasis, acne

Experience gained from treating various patients confirms that testing for food hypersensitivities and following a diet that eliminates the problem foods assists in treating eczema and psoriasis. Other individualized dietary advice related to eczema flare ups, such as the avoidance of histamine stimulating foods and drinks can also assist.

Acne is often aggravated by increases in steroid (sex) hormones. Certain foods commonly consumed can stimulate insulin-like growth factor and insulin, which in turn stimulates increases in the sex hormones associated with acne. Just one example of such a food is milk and other dairy products.

A dietary approach to acne, psoriasis and eczema is imperative, but it is not sufficient on its own. A holistic treatment plan using herbs, homeopathy and individualised nutraceutical supplements as necessary should be added. In cases of psoriasis and eczema it is often useful to do other testing such as heavy metal toxicity screening. For an integrative approach to treating acne make an appointment with Dr Cornelia Botha. For an integrative approach to treating eczema, Psoriasis and other rashes make an appointment with Dr Tanith Davidson.

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Food and digestive diseases

Abdominal bloating and pain, as well chronic constipation, diarrhea are common symptoms. In most cases the underlying cause of these symptoms isn’t serious, but they can severely affect a person’s quality of life. These symptoms are often blamed on irritable bowel syndrome without the benefit of adequate investigation. Investigation of these symptoms involves a thorough case taking combined with various diagnostic tests. Although food hypersensitivities are not always to blame, these should be excluded as a contributing factor with appropriate testing. Certain digestive disease such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) will always benefit from dietary and lifestyle changes in addition to treatment. Remember that certain drug treatments for reflux can cause bloating as a side effect. For an integrative approach to treating digestive diseases make an appointment with Dr Cornelia Botha.

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Food and respiratory diseases

Asthma is a disease sometimes fuel by allergies. Usually the triggers for asthma are inhaled allergens. Food and food additive allergies (caused by IgE reactions) are implicated in some asthma attacks too. In addition to this, Food hypersensitivity reactions can play a role in not only asthma, but can contribute to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), chronic sinusitis and chronic cough, including chronic bronchitis. Knowing what foods aggravate your asthma is an important component of your treatment regime. Various complementary interventions, including allergy desensitisation can work well for asthma. For an integrative approach to treating respiratory diseases make an appointment with Dr Cornelia Botha.

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Food and mental / emotional diseases

It is always important to consider the influences of diet in cases of depression, anxiety, irritability, and problems with memory & concentration. Incorrect diet can result in coexisting nutritional diseases such as anemia, insulin resistance or specific vitamin and mineral imbalances that will present with changes in mood or cognition. 

The latest research in depression, bipolar disorder and anxiety recommends including specific nutrients and supplements even in conjunction with drug treatments to improve the outcome of mood disorders. This should be done in addition to addressing unique nutrient disturbances present in each individual.

A trained practitioner, experienced in assessing and treating mood and cognitive disorders holistically will rely on a thorough case history including diet and lifestyle habits together with the results of various diagnostic techniques, including laboratory testing to assess nutritional status to develop a treatment regime for such disorders. Additional testing such as neurofeedback assessments and urine heavy metal challenge testing may complement such an approach.

Other lifestyle factors such as exercise, timing of meals, sleep quality and quantity, various vices such as intake of alcohol, recreational drugs and stimulants including caffeine should also be taken into consideration.

For an integrative approach to treating mood disorders make an appointment with Dr Tanith Davidson.

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Right click here to download a full document on food and health, including information from all links in this section.

Also see:
Food and headaches, insomnia, fatigue, recurrent infections etc
Food and health
Nutrigenomics: Learn how your diet and lifestyle interacts with your genes

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To make an appointment with either Dr Cornelia Botha or Dr Tanith Davidson please contact their receptionist by visiting the contact page.